My Booklist

Mathematics

  • A Mathematician Reads the Newspaper

    by John Allen Paulos Year Published:
    The author of Innumeracy travels through the pages of the daily newspaper revealing the hidden mathematical angels of articles we read everyday. From the Senate, SATs, and sex to crime, celebrities, and cults, Paulos takes stories that many not seem to involve mathematics and demonstrates how a lack of mathematical knowledge can handicap readers.
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  • Beyond Numeracy

    by John Allen Paulos Year Published:
    From the author of the national bestseller Innumeracy, a delightful exploration and explanation of mathematical concepts from algebra to zero in easily accessible alphabetical entries.
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  • Innumeracy: Mathematical Illiteracy and Its Conseq

    Innumeracy: Mathematical Illiteracy and Its Consequences

    by John Allen Paulos Year Published:
    Paulos argues that our inability to deal rationally with numbers--or with the probabilities associated with them--results in misinformed governmental policies, confused personal decisions, and an increased susceptibility to pseudo-sciences of all kinds.
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Baseball

  • Faithful: Two Diehard Boston Red Sox Fans Chronicl

    Faithful: Two Diehard Boston Red Sox Fans Chronicle the Historic 2004 Season

    by Stewart O'Nan, Stephen King Year Published:
    Early in 2004, two writers and Red Sox fans decided to chronicle the upcoming season, one of the most hotly anticipated in baseball history. Stewart O'Nan and Stephen King would sit together at Fenway. They would exchange e-mails. They would write about the games. And, as it happened, they would witness the greatest comeback ever in sports.
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  • Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game

    Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game

    by Michael Lewis Year Published:
    Following the low-budget Oakland Athletics, their larger-than-life general manager, Billy Beane, and the strange brotherhood of amateur baseball enthusiasts, Lewis has written not only "the single most influential baseball book ever" (Rob Neyer, "Slate") but also what "may be the best book ever written on business" ("Weekly Standard").
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  • My Turn at Bat: The Story of My Life

    by Ted Williams Year Published:
    Back in print for the first time in years, Ted Williams's classic autobiography now contains brand-new, never-before-published material. Praised by critics everywhere as one of the greatest sports books ever written.
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  • One Strike Away. the Story of the 1986 Red Sox

    by Dan Shaughnessy Year Published:
    The story of the 1986 Boston Red Sox and the World Series championship that escaped their grasp by an error on a play that would have been the final out for victory.
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  • Summer of '49

    by David Halberstam Year Published:
    In the finest tradition of baseball journalism, David Halberstam captures the drama and joy of the 1949 pennant race, which pitted the New York Yankees against the Boston Red Sox. Personalities include Joe DiMaggio, Ted Williams, Yogi Berra, and Jerry Coleman. Halberstam evokes a different time, when baseball was broadcast on the radio and games were played in daylight.
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  • Ted Williams: The Biography of an American Hero

    by Leigh Montville Year Published:
    With the death of baseball legend Ted Williams on July 5, 2002, "Sports Illustrated" ran Montville's powerful obituary as its much-praised cover story. With passion and precision, Montville conjures equally the powerful grace of Williams's legendary swing and his cultural aura of invincibility.
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  • The Physics of Baseball

    by Robert K. Adair Year Published:
    A Sterling Professor at Yale examines what a baseball does when thrown or batted under certain conditions--and why. Complete with understandable charts and graphs, baseball lore, and entertaining anecdotes about players and incidents, this book will fascinate and delight fans in a whole new way.
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  • The Science of Hitting

    by Ted Williams Year Published:
    Ted Williams was our greatest living expert on how to hit a baseball -- the last baseball player to hit .400 in the major leagues. Williams's career hitting statistics will stand forever as a monument to his complete mastery of the single most difficult thing to do in sport: .344 lifetime batting average, 521 home runs, 1839 RBI and 2654 hits. "The Science of Hitting" has reigned as "the" classic handbook on hitting since being published in 1971 -- and now it's even better! Ted's hitting advice has been updated, and exciting new color graphics and photos have been added to enhance your reading pleasure. The Gallery of Great Hitters has been expanded to include Ted's choices for the best hitters of the '70s and '80s: look inside to see who made the cut! You'll still find all of Ted's great advice on how to improve your turn at bat and become the best hitter possible. Learn: * How to think like a pitcher and guess the pitch * The three cardinal rules for developing a smooth line-drive swing * The secrets of hip and wrist action * Pitch selection * Bunting * Hitting the opposite way And much more! Whether you play the game or simply enjoy reading about it, you'll find "The Science of Hitting" an unforgettable addition to your sports library.
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  • The Teammates

    The Teammates

    by David Halberstam Year Published:
    Acclaimed historian Halberstam examines here the story of four friends and fellow ball players: Ted Williams, Dominic DiMaggio, Johnny Pesky, and Bobby Doerr. THE TEAMMATES tells of their friendship during their playing days with an eye to fine detail, and continues on through to their retired lives off the diamond.
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